OB/GYN Reports

OB/GYN related news - Powered By EZDoctor

Vaginal Health Mistakes

  • Playing Down Heavy Periods

Girlfriends may have warned that your periods could become heavier as you get older — but that’s not always true. “As menopause approaches, your periods may come closer together or farther apart, but they shouldn’t necessarily be heavier,” says Suzanne Kavic, MD, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. If your periods do become heavier, or if they’re coming way more often (like every two weeks), or you’re bleeding in between periods or after sex, let your doctor know. Heavy bleeding can be a sign of fibroids (benign uterine tumors), anemia, a hormonal issue like polycystic ovarian syndrome, or more rarely, cervical, uterine, or ovarian cancer.


  • Treating the Wrong Infection

“As soon as they experience any itching and discharge, most women assume it’s a yeast infection and apply an over-the-counter anti-fungal cream, but that’s not always the cause,” says Mary Peterson, MD, director of the Midlife Health Center at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s Magee-Women’s Hospital. Although yeast infections are common — nearly 75 percent of women have at least one in their lifetime — they are only one of three common vaginal infections. Bacterial vaginosis (BV), caused by an overgrowth of the bacteria in the vagina, and trichomoniasis (trich), a sexually transmitted infection, are the other two. Both vaginosis and trich can cause symptoms similar to those of yeast infections, which is why it’s so important to make sure it’s really a yeast infection. If left untreated, BV can cause pelvic inflammatory disease, and both BV and trich can make you more susceptible to sexually transmitted diseases. “If you’ve had lots of yeast infections and this seems to be exactly the same, you can probably get away with treating yourself,” Dr. Peterson says. However, if symptoms are slightly different or you’re just not sure, check with your doctor. Yeast infections, vaginosis, and trich are all easily treated. An over-the-counter or prescription anti-fungal cream or prescription pill will treat yeast; prescription antibiotics are needed for BV or trich.


  • Applying Talcum Powder

Patting on talcum powder (or any powders, including some baby powders, that list talc among their ingredients) to feel fresher isn’t just a harmless hygiene measure. The habit can raise your risk of invasive ovarian cancer by about 30 percent, according to new research presented at the 2011 annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research. Frequent, long-term use doubled or even tripled the risk. The study authors speculate that the powder could spread to the genital tract and create an inflammatory reaction. Peterson’s advice: Don’t use it. “There are other ways to keep dry,” she says. If you’re prone to sweating down there, Peterson recommends wearing cotton underwear and changing them often, avoiding tight-fitting pants, and going commando at night (to give the area a chance to breathe).


  • Forgetting About Kegel Exercises

Maybe you attempted Kegel exercises during or after pregnancy to tighten things up, but not doing them regularly can set you up for urinary incontinence later in life. If you had incontinence then, it’s more likely to strike again when you’re older, says Peterson. According to a University of Washington survey, urinary incontinence affects more than 40 percent of women in their forties and almost half of all women over age 50. The problem occurs when the muscles in the pelvic area become weaker (due to such issues as pregnancy, childbirth, menopause, or excessive weight), which can lead to urine leaks when you exercise, cough, or laugh. Kegels strengthen those weak muscles and prevent or improve symptoms. Need a refresher? Imagine you’re going to the bathroom, then squeeze as though you’re trying to stop the flow. Aim to do three sets of 12 to 15 a day.


  • Not Using Birth Control

If you’ve skipped a period or two and have what seem to be hot flashes, you may think you can no longer get pregnant because you’re starting to enter menopause. But you’re wrong. “As long as you’re having periods of any kind, no matter how irregular they are, there is always a chance of becoming pregnant,” Peterson says. In fact, an analysis by the Pew Research Center found that in 2008, 14 percent of births were to women age 35 and older (compared to 10 percent of births to teen moms). More than half of all pregnancies in women over age 40 are unintended, according to the Guttmacher Institute, a sexual and reproductive health research organization. So don’t toss out birth control unless you’re okay with getting pregnant. “You’re not safe until it’s been at least a year since your last menstrual period,” says Peterson.


  • Skipping Barrier Contraceptives

Adults over age 40 are less likely to use condoms than younger people, according to the National Survey of Sexual Health and Behavior (NSSHB), which evaluated sexual health information collected from almost 6,000 people between the ages of 14 and 94 — and the unsafe habit is affecting their health. In 2009, people between age 50 and 64 accounted for 15 percent of all new HIV diagnoses. Diseases such as chlamydia and syphilis are also on the rise among people over 40, according to the latest U.S. government data. Even if you use hormonal birth control, or you’re past menopause and have no chance of getting pregnant, it’s still a good idea to use condoms every time you have sex “unless you’re in a mutually monogamous relationship and you and your partner have both been tested for sexually transmitted infections,” says Peterson.


  • Putting Sex on the Back Burner

According to data published last year in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, 30 percent of women in their forties and 50 percent of women in their fifties say they hadn't had vaginal sexual intercourse in the previous year. And — surprisingly — such a dry spell could affect their health down there. “When estrogen levels drop after menopause, the tissues of the vagina tend to flatten and become thinner, which can cause painful sex, as well as itching, dryness, burning, and discomfort,” says Machelle Seibel, MD, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester. But having sex regularly can help prevent symptoms by keeping the vagina moisturized and improving elasticity. If you experience vaginal dryness during intercourse, a good lubricant can make things more comfortable. For women who aren’t sexually active, consider self-stimulation with a vibrator and non-hormonal vaginal moisturizers, like Replens, or vaginal estrogen creams, rings, or pills.


  • Wearing a Panty Liner Too Often

If your periods are irregular or you’re dealing with incontinence, you may wear a panty liner frequently to avoid embarrassing situations. But this can set you up for infections and irritation. “The plastic backing on the panty liner prevents air from flowing through and retains heat and sweat, and wearing the same one for too long can lead to bacterial or fungal infections,” Peterson says. Plus, the constant rubbing may cause vulvar irritation. Having a change of underwear, keeping tampons or pads on hand for unexpected periods, and managing incontinence with Kegels, lifestyle changes, or medication may reduce your reliance on panty liners. When you do use them, change your panty liner at least every four hours.


  • Not Seeing Your Doctor Enough

According to the most recent guidelines from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, women 30 and older who have had three consecutive, negative (meaning normal) Pap tests need only get Paps every three years. But that doesn’t mean you can skip your annual checkup. Your gynecologist still needs to see you once a year — and the clinical breast exam and bimanual pelvic exam she’ll perform can help detect serious health issues like cancer, ovarian cysts, and fibroids. It’s also a great opportunity to get advice on anything from hot flashes to birth control to your sex drive.

Make sure you make an appointment to see your doctor through ezdoctor.com. You can search for doctors and filter by specialty, name and insurance plan. Before booking your appointment, make sure you get an EZDoctor Report. EZDoctor Reports contain important information about doctors such as; malpractice claims, criminal offenses, and board actions. Go to ezdoctor.com now to get started.

Original and full article: everyday health.com 


5 Ways to Improve your Health in Less Than 5 Minutes

Prioritize. Give yourself permission to admit that you can't do everything, all at once. Instead, you can nibble away at your to-do list, and feel more satisfied, by setting some priorities. So make a list, figure out what really matters, what can wait, and what you can skip. Work your way down the list, handling your top priorities first. 

Pack a snack. Before you head out the door in the morning, prep a healthy snack to take with you. Ideas include fruit, unsalted nuts, and low-fat cheese or yogurt.

Meditate. It's easier than you may think. Here's how: Settle into a comfortable position in a chair or on the floor. Then follow your breath -- in, out -- for a few minutes. Thoughts are bound to bubble up in your mind -- no problem. Just let them float by and turn your attention back to your breath. Meditating daily, even just for a few minutes, may help tame stress.

Stretch. Just a few easy moves will do. Stretch your arms overhead. Raise and lower your shoulders a couple of times. Stretch your legs as you lean your torso against a wall. Be gentle, so you don't overdo it. Stretching can help improve your circulation and flexibility, and may help ease the tight muscles that come with stress.

Turn off your electronics. Take a little break from all your gadgets. Staring at computer screens and electronics all day long can zap your energy and encourage inactivity. So log off -- of everything -- every now and then. This is especially important to allow you to unwind and relax before bed. Just because the world is on, 24-7, you don't have to be!

Source: Webmd.com

EZDoctor and April Partner to Offer Virtual Doctor Visits to International Travelers

EZDoctor, the leader in healthcare transparency and April, a global travel insurance provider have recently partnered to offer telemedicine services to patients traveling abroad that are in need of medical assistance.

The alliance between EZDoctor and April, allows patients to remotely consult with a U.S. board certified physician while traveling abroad.

With EZDoctor's support, April will be connecting their travelers from around the world with doctors anytime, anywhere needing only a webcam enabled device and a reliable internet connection.

These virtual physician consultations are not intended to treat emergency medical conditions/situations. Patients will receive primary care services, treatment for common ailments like the flu, allergies, rashes etc. and educational and informative medical advice from a trained and thoroughly screened professional.

EZDoctor and April are working together to improve the doctor-patient experience by providing on demand consultations and with doctors readily available to treat patients 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. To serve the needs of April's global travelers patients are connected with U.S. physicians within 15 minutes and can currently request doctors that are fluent in English, Spanish, French, or Portuguese.

According to the American Telemedicine Association, approximately 10 million patients benefited from using telemedicine last year. The telemedicine industry is developing quickly and becoming more prominent in societies around the world. EZDoctor and April are two leaders expanding quality telemedicine services worldwide.

"We're very excited about this partnership, we believe patients should have access to a board certified physician anywhere and anytime. As telemedicine continues to be a rapidly growing component of healthcare in the United States, we want to provide patients an accessible way to treat their healthcare needs when they are away from home," said David Marsidi, EZDoctor's founder and CEO.

"April & EZDoctor are both convenient, progressive thought leaders in the way we prioritize the patient's needs and that is what we want to deliver through this new service by offering a fast, easy, reliable and secure doctor consultations," continued Marsidi. "Together we will deliver the world-class healthcare service that patients deserve."        

EZDoctor and April patients will:

  • Have access to telemedicine services 24/7.
  • Resolve unexpected medical problems when traveling.
  • Receive virtual physicians consultations from any location worldwide.
  • Connect with a physician within 15 minutes of their request.
  • Have better outcomes because of timelier access to a physician.
  • Reduce unnecessary admissions, save time and money.
  • Receive primary care services on the go.

About EZDoctor
EZDoctor, healthcare technology business located in Florida, provides healthcare services nationwide. As an advocate for healthcare information transparency, EZDoctor developed a Carfax type of report but for doctors called EZDoctor Reports, to help patients make better decisions when it comes to choosing a doctor. With their rapid growth in the healthcare technology industry and over 1.5M+ doctor profiles, EZDoctor has radically transformed the industry by connecting healthcare consumers with the best doctors and equipping them with accurate information to make an informed healthcare decision.

About April
April has been a leading brand providing quality Travel and other Specialty Insurance programs providing services in Europe, Latin America and the U.S.
April offers comprehensive travel insurance & assistance plans covering multiple trips for frequent travelers. 

Quick Tips for Choosing a Doctor

When you choose a primary care doctor for yourself or a loved one, make sure to choose a doctor you can trust. A primary care doctor can help you make important decisions, like which screening tests and shots to get, treat many health problems, refer you to a specialist when you need more help with a specific health issue.

Here are some things you should know before selecting a physician

  • Listens to your opinions and concerns
  • Encourages you to ask questions
  • Explains things in ways you can understand

When you and your doctor work together as a team, you’ll get better health care. Try the following tips to find a doctor who’s right for you.

Research your doctor.

If you have health insurance, you may need to choose a doctor in their network. Some insurance plans may let you choose a doctor outside the network if you pay more of the cost.

What you should know about your doctor:

  • Contact information, Locations and Gender. 
  • License Information. It is important to know if your doctor is licensed to provide the care that you need.
  • Education. To learn more about your physician’s background EZDoctor Reports contain information regarding where they studied, graduation date, board certifications, as well as their internship, residency and fellowship. This will help you make an educated decision regarding your doctor’s training and ability.
  • Hospital Affiliations/Privileges.  Its common practice for a doctor to have their office in one location and perform treatment in a separate location. For example, you could go to a doctor’s office for a consultation regarding your knee and that doctor might provide treatment and/or surgery at a hospital that he is affiliated with or has privileges. By having this information before hand, it can help you in deciding whether this doctor would be the most convenient for you.
  • Procedure Pricing Information. When taking care of any health concern, one of the main things we consider is the cost associated with any procedures that might be necessary. An EZDoctor report will display an average charge for procedures performed by the physician you are reviewing.
  • Patient Referral Summary.  Primary care physicians, when needed, refer patients to a specialist. Especially when they face a diagnosis that is beyond their Scope of Practice. With an EZDoctor report you will see the  physicians referral pattern.
  • Pricing/Prescribing Habits. Is your  doctor more likely to prescribe a name brand versus a generic drug? Despite your preference, by seeing a breakdown of the most common prescriptions a physician orders you can get a clear view of his prescribing tendencies and average price per prescription.
  • Disciplinary Actions. Finding out if a physician has been sanctioned or not by a state medical board can be very useful when it comes to selecting a doctor to visit. Equally important is to know  what those infractions were related to.
  • Criminal Offenses. While federal criminal records are not available to the public, EZDoctor reports include state government records that indicate whether a physician has ever been charged or convicted of a crime. Allowing you to have this information prior to any consultation and/or treatment.
  • Malpractice Claims. You have the right to know if your physician has been involved in any incidents regarding his medical care. From surgical and medication errors to misdiagnoses, EZDoctor will provide the information you need.
  • Patient Reviews. It’s always good to know what other patients are saying about a physician. EZDoctor reports collect patient reviews from multiple sources.

Other important questions to ask about the doctor:

  • Is the doctor taking new patients?
  • Is the doctor part of a group practice? Who are the other doctors?
  • Who will see you if your doctor isn’t available?
  • Which hospital does the doctor use?
  • If you have a medical condition, does the doctor have experience treating it?
  • What languages does the doctor speak? 

You can find all the information you need on a physician by obtaining an EZDoctor Report. Go to ezdoctor.com now to get started! 

Source: healthfinder.gov

How to become and OB/GYN

Step 1: Complete an Undergraduate Degree Program

Prospective OBGYNs must pursue a four-year undergraduate degree such as a Bachelor of Science in Human Biology. Students may consider taking courses in biology, chemistry and anatomy, which provide a foundation of education for medical school and human health. Most programs that offer science degrees also include laboratory courses, which allow students to become familiarized with lab equipment and procedures.

Step 2: Pass the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT)

Upon graduating from a bachelor's degree program, aspiring OBGYNs are required to pass the MCAT to gain entry into medical school. The MCAT is an intensive, day-long exam that tests students on biology, chemistry and physics, in addition to reading and writing skills. The Association of American Medical Colleges notes that roughly half of the students who apply to medical school are accepted (www.aamc.org). As a result, many pre-med students begin studying for the exam well in advance of college graduation.

Step 3: Complete Medical School

Like all physicians and surgeons, OBGYNs must complete a 4-year medical school program. Aspiring OBGYNs take many of the same courses as general physicians, but may choose classes with a concentration in obstetrics and gynecology. Medical school programs also include extensive hands-on practice through clinical rotations in which students can gain experience in OBGYN.

Step 4: Complete a Medical Residency

After concluding the academic portion of their training, OBGYN students must complete an internship and residency in a hospital. An internship is usually a year long, while a medical residency may last between 3-7 years. During a medical residency, OBGYN students are paid employees and may evaluate patients, create treatment plans and observe patient progress.

Step 5: Obtain Licensure

State licensure is mandatory in order to officially become an OBGYN. Students who are licensed can legally begin medical practice in the U.S. and its related territories. Licensure requires passing the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), which tests a physician's ability to relate medical concepts and principles to their practice (www.usmle.org).

Read more: study.com